Chinese Visa Regulations Latest

Chinese Visa Regulations Latest

Chinese visa problems are a constant thorn in the side of the foreign community living in China. Over the past couple of months the Chinese government has announced rather drastic changes to Chinese visa regulations which has thrown up huge problems for China’s expat community.

Hundreds of foreigners who have been living in China for years without any many problems have been forced to up-stakes and leave the country which they had made their home, and tales are emerging of mainland expats being trapped in Hong Kong, unable to get permission to re-enter China. Those that are given permission are generally have only been able to obtain a 14-day Chinese visa from the Hong Kong Chinese consulate.

Changing Chinese visa regulations seems to happen almost annually in China with reasons such as the Olympics or the 60th anniversary of the PRC being given as the reasons for change. However these changes normally blow over within a couple of months and the Chinese visa regulations become more relaxed again. However, this time the changes seem to be more widespread and more seriously enforced by the Chinese bureau of Exit and Entry. They seem to be saying ‘Let’s have a serious clear-out of unwanted foreigners’.

As from the 1st of September China finalised the new visa regulations and have released the relevant information.
 

New Chinese Visa Regulations

Based on one’s purpose of entry, the Regulations have provided for the following 12 types of visas:

  • C Visa Applicable to train attendants, air crew members and seamen operating international services, and to their accompanying family members
  • D Visa Applicable to foreigners who are to reside permanently in China
  • F Visa Applicable to foreigners who come to China for exchanges, visits and inspections
  • G Visa Applicable to foreigners who transit through China
  • J-1 Visa Applicable to resident foreign journalists in China (long term stay – more than 180 days)
  • J-2 Visa Applicable to foreign journalists who make short trips to China for reporting tasks (short term stay – less than or equal to 180 days)
  • L Visa Applicable to overseas tourists (those traveling with tour groups can be issued a group L Visa)
  • M Visa Applicable to foreigners who come to China for business or commercial activities
  • Q-1 Visa Applicable to foreigners who apply for entry into China for family reunification with Chinese relatives or foreigners with permanent residency in China, as well as to those who need to visit China for adoption issues (long term stay – more than 180 days)
  • Q-2 Visa Applicable to foreigners who come to China for a temporary visit to Chinese citizens or foreigners with permanent residency in China (short term stay – less than or equal to 180 days)
  • R Visa Applicable to senior-level foreign talents and foreign nationals whose special skills are urgently needed in China
  • S-1 Visa Applicable to spouses, parents, parents-in-law and children under 18 years old of foreigners who stay in China for study or working purposes, and to foreigners who need to reside in China for other personal reasons (long term stay – more than 180 days)
  • S-2 Visa Applicable to family members of foreigners who stay in China for study or working purposes, and to foreigners who need to reside in China for other personal reasons (short term stay – less than or equal to 180 days)
  • X-1 visa is applicable to foreigners who come to China for a long-term study period (more than 180 days)
  • X-2 visa is applicable to foreigners who come to China for a short-term study period (less than or equal to 180 days)
  • Z Visa Applicable to foreigners who apply to work in China

This information was taken from China Briefing.

 

Chinese Visa HK

Many foreigners are stuck in Hong Kong awaiting their visa.


 

Chinese Visa Processing Time

The processing times for Chinese Visas will remain approximately the same as they have been. According to the official Hong Kong Visa office website processing times range from 2-4 days depending on which service you select.

If you are applying in your home country these times may differ. For example the Chinese Visa processing time for London is 4-10 days depending on the selected service.

 

Chinese Visa Cost

Chinese Visa costs and prices again vary depending on which country you hold a passport for. American visa prices tend to be much higher than other countries. You can find the Chinese visa cost at your local Chinese embassy website.

 

Chinese Visa Application Process and Requirements.

The Chinese Visa Application process depends on which type of visa you will be applying for. For tourist (L) visas under the new regulations you will need to supply a travel itinerary along with plane tickets going both in and out of China or an invitation letter from somebody who is permanently residing in China.

Other types of Chinese visas require documentation to prove who invited you and what activities you will be doing in China.

Many Chinese Visa companies offer a service where you can send them your passport along with the relevant documents and they will return your passport with the Chinese visa inside. However, the best option is always to go to the embassy or consulate yourself, fill in the application forms and turn in your visa application yourself. This way you can avoid service and postal fees, and the consulate or embassy staff can give you up-to-date advice on the current application process.

So it seems the days of making the cheap and easy visa run to Hong Kong are over. Whether these new regulations will stick and as to their effectiveness in solving the troubles currently being experienced by many long-term China residents regarding visas remains to be seen. However RamblinMik intends to keep track of the situation and keep you updated. For now, the best way to find out if any of the changes apply to you are to contact your local Chinese embassy and enquire.

4 Comments

  1. Thomas Sampson
    Thomas Sampson |

    Latest updates from my girlfriend is that a US Passport gets only a one month tourist visa in Hong Kong at best…probably the same for the lot of us.

  2. I’m staying in London :)

  3. Any suggestions for a person married to a Chinese national who is interested in a short term study program? Would it be wiser to change the visa to a student visa or keep it as a family reunion permit?

  4. I see your page needs some unique & fresh articles.
    Writing manually is time consuming, but there is solution for this hard
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